Now available for your reading enjoyment

Well, today’s the day.

My book – GO AHEAD AND ASK!, VOLUME 1 – is officially available.

It contains 42 interviews with script consultants, and offers a wide variety of helpful advice that could benefit any screenwriter, no matter how much or how little experience they have, as well as each person’s contact info (where applicable), and of course, their favorite kind of pie.

And as the title indicates, this is the first volume. The second and third, featuring interviews with not only more consultants, but also screenwriters, filmmakers, and writers in other mediums, are slated for release in the late June/early July and mid-September timeframes, respectively.

In the meantime, I hope you’ll be interested enough in wanting to take a look at this one.

Thanks for reading, enjoy the book, and have a piece of pie with my compliments.

7 days and counting…

Just a friendly reminder that my book GO AHEAD AND ASK!, VOLUME 1, comes out next week (22 April).*

It contains some of the over 100 interviews I’ve done with script consultants, writers, filmmakers, and overall creative types, as well as their contact information, plus a wide variety of what kinds of pie they all enjoy.

I’ve received an advance copy, and I’m thrilled with how it turned out.

I sincerely hope you’ll take a look.

*Volumes 2 and 3 tentatively scheduled for late June/early July and September, respectively

Clear some space on your bookshelf

Coming soon to a trillion-dollar online retailer near you!

This one’s been a long time in development, and I’m quite thrilled to be able to finally discuss it.

Over the past few years, I’ve done over 100 interviews with script consultants, screenwriters, television writers, filmmakers, and writers across several mediums on this blog, and my intent for quite a long time was to collect them all in a book.

Turns out all of those interviews in print form would have resulted in a book approximately 700-750 pages long, so the book then became two.

After some additional editing and formatting, along with a little more re-evaluating, it was decided that the two would actually work better as three.

So…

My 3-book GO AHEAD AND ASK! series will be coming out over the next few months.

Volume 1 collects the original set of interviews that kicked the whole thing off, and will be available in paperback on Amazon starting on 22 April.

(All three books will only be available in paperback. Sorry, e-readers.)

Volumes 2 and 3 contain the interviews that have come out since then, with Volume 2 slated for release in either late June or early July, and Volume 3 wrapping things up in September.

I am truly elated to finally be able to offer these books to the screenwriting community, and hope they prove to be both informative and entertaining, as well as inspire you to enjoy a piece of pie while you read them, because what else would match so perfectly with something I wrote?

Q & A with Brooks Elms

Brooks W Stripes

Brooks Elms is a WGA screenwriter of 25+ scripts with a specialty of crafting grounded personal characters and gut-punch story tension. He’s currently rewriting an Oscar-winning writer. Brooks also loves coaching fellow writers who have a burning ambition to deeply serve their audiences: www.BrooksElms.com

What’s the last thing you read or watched that you thought was incredibly well-written?

JOKER. Because it’s difficult to build empathy for protagonists with flaws that lead to violence against innocent people, especially with all the mass shootings these days. I have ethical questions about whether this was a worthy screenplay to produce because the film can’t help but celebrate what it’s also trying to condemn. And I suspect it will inspire as much (if not more) negative consequences as positive ones – but that makes the screenwriting all the more impressive and skillful. Because this was a very popular film and the bar was VERY high for that level of success.

How’d you get your start in the industry?

Making movies with my friends in high school, which led to NYU film school, then writing, directing and producing indie features. In the last decade, I’ve mostly focused on screenwriting. In between my writing assignments, I taught a screenwriting class at UCLA Extention for a while and now I coach other ambitious writers working at the intermediate to professional levels, as my own schedule allows.

Is recognizing good writing something you think can be taught or learned?

What’s the alternative theory – that people come out of the womb knowing how to write well? It’s a matter of defining what you love about other stories and getting familiar with the craft choices that lead to those results. I teach this to everybody from beginners to veteran writers so…. yup.

What do you consider the components of a good script?

It’s about the harmony between components. The craft is taking elements (premise, hero, goal, conflict, structure, relationships, setting, theme, tone, etc..) and adjusting aspects of them (size, shape, style, amount, etc..) until we find the right collective balance which allows something bigger to speak through the parts.

What are some of the most common screenwriting mistakes you see?

Losing touch with the delight of the process. And stopping because of that.

What story tropes are you just tired of seeing?

Every trope has the potential to be powerful if created with authenticity. It only feels cliche when there’s too much emotional distance from the truth of the intention.

What are some key rules/guidelines every writer should know?

I stay away from language choices like what “every writer should know X”. Those types of words can be a distraction from listening to the subtle impulses of your voice. Instead, I invite people to follow their passion. What excites us about our current story? How can we play with elements to unleash more of that excitement? When we share material for feedback, what’s blocking other people from deeper levels of excitement? “Confusion” is the most common blockage followed by “tepid goals and conflicts.”

Have you ever read a spec script that was an absolute, without-a-doubt “recommend”? If so, what were the reasons why?

The Duffer Brothers’ HIDDEN, which they wrote before STRANGER THINGS. It was a masterful display of milking tension using minimal assets in a scene. I used that script to teach myself how to make a huge impact on the way I write tension.

How do you feel about screenwriting contests? Worth it or not?

ALL the paths toward advancing your career have you pitted against the odds. So just pick the paths that speak to you and your budget. Contests can certainly be helpful so have fun playing that game, and detach from the outcomes. It’s about enjoying the journey and welcoming those that come along that happen to love your work as much as you do.

How can people find out more about you and the services you provide?

Check out www.BrooksElms.com

I run a few programs for writers looking to cross milestones as fast as humanly possible, in ways that are effortless and fun. One program is a deep dive 1:1 mentorship that’s very exclusive and competitive to get into. And I have other ways of helping writers too. So if writers enjoy the content they’ve seen from me online, I suggest they reach out because my team will be happy to help, in one way or another.

Readers of this blog are more than familiar with my love/appreciation of pie. What’s your favorite kind?

Now we’re getting to the essential question. The answer is pecan. It’s rich, heavenly and it shines beneath a scoop of vanilla ice cream. Shout out to banana cream for a close second place. It can be spectacular when it’s baked well, but breaks my heart when it’s often messed up.

The 2018 Maximum Z Screenwriter’s Gift Guide

xmas window
“Have you been a good writer this year, Johnny?”

Not sure what to get that special screenwriter in your life, or are you a writer and want to splurge and get yourself a little something? Well, worry no more because here’s an extensive list of gift ideas any writer would absolutely love! 

SCRIPT CONSULTANTS

Some offers include a code for the discount, so if you contact one NOT listing a code, make sure to tell them you found them via Maximum Z – or you run the risk of not getting any discount at all.

ScriptArsenal – 20% off script coverage services through 14 Dec with the code MAXIMUM20

Anna Koukouli of Lilifornia Diaries Productions – 15% off coverage services through 31 Dec with the code BLACKFRIDAY15

Andrew Hilton, The Screenplay Mechanic – 10% discount through 1 Jan on consulting services

Jim Mercurio – 10% discount on coaching, professional or comprehensive analysis, or on DVDs

Mark Sanderson – $25 off through 31 Dec on script consulting services

EJ Runyon – Bridge to Story  – 6 writing coaching sessions for the price of 5

We Fix Your Script – 10% discount on coverage and submissions to Script Summit competition on Coverfly

Phil Clarke – 20% off until 30 Nov for analysis, annotation, or A&A service in 2019

Danny Manus – 10% off through 1 Dec for Basic Written Notes Service and TV Notes Service with code MAXZ18

Barri Evins – Spine-tingling sale through 14 Dec on all services, but good anytime

David Silverman – 10% off script consulting services

Andrew Zinnes – 15% discount on all services

Gregory Blair – 10% off through 31 Dec for consulting services

Angela Bourassa of LA Screenwriter – new rate for logline help – $29, and a new item – Make A Movie Magnets – complete set for $9

Gerald Hanks of Story Into Screenplay – 10% discount through 31 Dec on feature coverage services and the one-hour phone consultation

Scotty Cornfield – no matter the genre, if your script involves police or law enforcement, and you want to make sure those parts are accurate, former police detective Scotty is offering a 10% discount on services to help accomplish exactly that

Howard Casner – 10% off script consultation services, and here’s a link to his book MORE RANTINGS & RAVINGS

Script Reader Pro – Script Hackr online screenwriting course for $59 (normally $299) through 1 Dec using code SCR1PT

BOOKS, BOOKS, BOOKS!

Even writers know they should take a little break, and what better way to relax than with a good book? Here are some about screenwriitng, along with a few that cover all sorts of other topics and genres.

Tracee Beebe‘s book – No Excuses. Write Anyway!: A Tough-Love Workbook for Screenwriters

Travis Seppala – 365: A Year of Screenwriting Tips

Don Holley – Half Loaded

Chip Street21 Things You Need to Know About Screenplay Options: The Indie Screenwriter’s Guide To Protecting Yourself And Getting The Best Deal

Brian GallagherDoing Time In Hollywood

Cali GilbertIt’s Simply Filmmaking

Lucy V Hay – link to free book How NOT To Write Female Characters, plus links to her other books

Brian Drake – his latest thriller Skills to Kill

James Syring – Zen and the Art of Fly Fishing and The Founding Fathers Farewell Tour of the U.S. of A. – both available on Amazon and Lulu Press

Karen M. Bryson‘s noir crime novel Suicide Blonde, which is part of Death and Damages, a 25-book mystery and thriller box set.

Martyn Armstrong – free pdf about running a crowdfunding campaign

Filmmaker Ronald Owen has launched a crowdfunding campaign to help produce his short Outwit. Donate if you can!

A HELPING HAND

With this being the season of giving, a few writing chums going through a bit of a rough time could use a little help, so donate if you can.

Jerron Spencer

Jason Killpack

Garison Piatt