A little logline help

lumberjacks
In retrospect, we should have clarified to the art department what a logline actually is

As part of my latest effort to get organized regarding self-marketing, I went through my loglines and tweaked them accordingly. Compared to their predecessors, they now seem to pack a bit more of a punch, which was my intent.

You never know the difference it makes when you add a word, take one out, or switch it out with a word you didn’t realize was stronger until after the actual switching.

The logline is what makes the first true impression on a reader. Does yours do the job you need it to?

Does the logline for your comedy offer up a funny premise?

Got a thriller or horror? Then that logline should jumpstart the goosebumps.

Do we eagerly anticipiate the pending rollercoaster ride for your action-adventure?

To utilize a somewhat clunky food metaphor, the logline gives us a sample taste for the exquisite meal we expect from the script.

That’s if the logline works. But what if you think it’s lacking the necessary ‘oomph’ it needs?

Worry no more. Friend-of-the-blog Angela Bourassa of LA Screenwriter has written 10 Steps to a Compelling Logline, which offers up some exceptionally helpful advice and guidelines. And if you’re still feeling stuck, here’s a link to her high-quality logline service.

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